Abstract

The games have changed yet they remain the same. Sport is not static. It continually changes - the organisation of sport has changed radically in my lifetime alone, never mind in the past century or more. Every retired athlete, coach or even fan, nostalgically claims that the sport they value is not what it once was. It has gone from localised practices institutionalised amongst communities to national, regional, and now worldwide institutional control that exceeds state or local controls. Yet however modern sport has changed, its base claim throughout its existence is that sport is for a common good. It is time to transform sport rather than allow it to merely change.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures
EditorsDaniel Burdsey, Thomas Carter, Mark Doidge
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages107-120
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9781138052246
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Sports
coach
fan
athlete
community
Values

Cite this

Carter, T. (2018). In Whose Humanity? In D. Burdsey, T. Carter, & M. Doidge (Eds.), Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures (pp. 107-120). Abingdon: Routledge.
Carter, Thomas. / In Whose Humanity?. Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures. editor / Daniel Burdsey ; Thomas Carter ; Mark Doidge. Abingdon : Routledge, 2018. pp. 107-120
@inbook{783c493d99c3469f80dfd65066aec6a1,
title = "In Whose Humanity?",
abstract = "The games have changed yet they remain the same. Sport is not static. It continually changes - the organisation of sport has changed radically in my lifetime alone, never mind in the past century or more. Every retired athlete, coach or even fan, nostalgically claims that the sport they value is not what it once was. It has gone from localised practices institutionalised amongst communities to national, regional, and now worldwide institutional control that exceeds state or local controls. Yet however modern sport has changed, its base claim throughout its existence is that sport is for a common good. It is time to transform sport rather than allow it to merely change.",
author = "Thomas Carter",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "25",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781138052246",
pages = "107--120",
editor = "Daniel Burdsey and Thomas Carter and Mark Doidge",
booktitle = "Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

Carter, T 2018, In Whose Humanity? in D Burdsey, T Carter & M Doidge (eds), Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures. Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 107-120.

In Whose Humanity? / Carter, Thomas.

Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures. ed. / Daniel Burdsey; Thomas Carter; Mark Doidge. Abingdon : Routledge, 2018. p. 107-120.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapterResearch

TY - CHAP

T1 - In Whose Humanity?

AU - Carter, Thomas

PY - 2018/1/25

Y1 - 2018/1/25

N2 - The games have changed yet they remain the same. Sport is not static. It continually changes - the organisation of sport has changed radically in my lifetime alone, never mind in the past century or more. Every retired athlete, coach or even fan, nostalgically claims that the sport they value is not what it once was. It has gone from localised practices institutionalised amongst communities to national, regional, and now worldwide institutional control that exceeds state or local controls. Yet however modern sport has changed, its base claim throughout its existence is that sport is for a common good. It is time to transform sport rather than allow it to merely change.

AB - The games have changed yet they remain the same. Sport is not static. It continually changes - the organisation of sport has changed radically in my lifetime alone, never mind in the past century or more. Every retired athlete, coach or even fan, nostalgically claims that the sport they value is not what it once was. It has gone from localised practices institutionalised amongst communities to national, regional, and now worldwide institutional control that exceeds state or local controls. Yet however modern sport has changed, its base claim throughout its existence is that sport is for a common good. It is time to transform sport rather than allow it to merely change.

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781138052246

SP - 107

EP - 120

BT - Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures

A2 - Burdsey, Daniel

A2 - Carter, Thomas

A2 - Doidge, Mark

PB - Routledge

CY - Abingdon

ER -

Carter T. In Whose Humanity? In Burdsey D, Carter T, Doidge M, editors, Transforming Sport: Knowledges, Practices and Structures. Abingdon: Routledge. 2018. p. 107-120