‘I don’t sound like a Geordie!’ Phonological and morphosyntactic features of Carlisle English

Sandra Jansen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

The aim of this short article is to provide an overview of phonological andmorphosyntactic aspects of the dialect of Carlisle English, an urban variety of north-ern English. Carlisle English is relatively unknown in England and when heard it isoften identified as Newcastle English or Scottish English. Its geographical isolation,the proximity to the Scottish border and its relation to Newcastle in the north east ofthe country give this urban area a unique setting which provides insights into the useand absence of linguistic identity markers.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOf butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw
EditorsNils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, Beyza Björkman
Place of PublicationStockholm
PublisherActa Universitatis Stockholmiensis
Pages209-224
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9789187235344
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2013

Keywords

  • Northern English
  • Carlisle English
  • Cumbria
  • Scottish English
  • Newcastle English

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘I don’t sound like a Geordie!’ Phonological and morphosyntactic features of Carlisle English'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Jansen, S. (2013). ‘I don’t sound like a Geordie!’ Phonological and morphosyntactic features of Carlisle English. In N-L. Johannesson, G. Melchers, & B. Björkman (Eds.), Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw (pp. 209-224). Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis.