Head impact forces in blind football are greater in competition than training and increased cervical strength may reduce impact magnitude

Daniel Fitzpatrick, Peter Thompson, Courtney Kipps, Nick Webborn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Paralympic Blind Association Football has the highest rate of injury of any Paralympic sport and head injuries are common. This study aims to quantify head impact incidence and magnitude in Blind Football, and to examine contributing factors. This Observational study based on a Blind Football Team comprising seven male athletes 28.63 years (SD 9.74, range 16–46) over 6 months. Head mounted impact sensors were used to measure the frequency and location of impacts, as well as their linear acceleration and rotational velocity. Cervical isometric strength and proprioception was measured. There were 374 impacts recorded in 212.5 athlete hours. There was a higher rate of impacts in matches than training (Incidence Risk Ratio 2.58, 95% CI 2.01–3.30). Greater cervical strength was associated with reduced linear acceleration of impacts (R 2 = 0.1912, p =.020). Blind Football players are exposed to a greater number of head impacts in matches than training. Neck muscle strength may influence magnitude of head impact forces in this sport but further study is required to further investigate.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • blind football
  • cervical strength
  • Concussion
  • injury prevention

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