Habitat diversity determines ghyll woodland species diversity. Adding complexity to the species area relationship, a new predictive model?

S. Waite, Niall Burnside, A.R. Flint

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

Ghylls are linear valley features cut into the sandstone beds of the Weald of south-eastern England. The indigenous ghyll woodlands are highly species rich, supporting distinctive assemblages of cryptogamic plants. We assessed the ability of the species-area relationship, the Choros model and a modified version of the Choros model to describe variations in higher plant diversity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to produce proxy environmental variables, multi-regression analysis of which allowed factors determining diversity to be investigated. Field layer diversity varied substantially between ghylls. The data did not fit the species area relationship. A statistically weak fit was provided by the standard Choros model. The modified Choros model, incorporating a PCA generated proxy variable for habitat diversity, provided a good fit. The results suggest that ghyll field layer diversity is primarily determined by habitat diversity and to a lesser extent by ghyll isolation, length and area.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFuture Landscape Ecology
EditorsA. Eycott, D. Scott, R.J. Smithers
PublisherInternational Association of Landscape Ecology UK
ISBN (Print)0954713052
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Ghyll woodlands
  • Species area relationship
  • Choros model

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    Waite, S., Burnside, N., & Flint, A. R. (2010). Habitat diversity determines ghyll woodland species diversity. Adding complexity to the species area relationship, a new predictive model? In A. Eycott, D. Scott, & R. J. Smithers (Eds.), Future Landscape Ecology International Association of Landscape Ecology UK. http://www.springer.com/life+sciences/ecology/journal/10980