Governance, Gender and the Appropriation of Natural Resources

A Case Study of ‘Left-Behind’ Women’s Collective Action in China

Yanqiang Du, Neil Ravenscroft, Yan Wang, Pingyang Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

China’s rapid urbanization has created large scale of population migration, resulting in many villages being dominated by “left-behind” women, and weak governance of those collectively owned resources. The situation has required these women to take up the functions of decision-making and governance as a remedial mechanism as well as a new path. Based on a case study in a typical hollowing-out village in central China, this paper explores an example of left-behind women’s collective action to prevent the over-exploitation of community and resources. It finds out that although traditionally excluded from public activities and marginalized, the “left-behind” women were able to mobilize and enhance collective action. When empowered, they are growing fast with endurance and courage, and as capable as anyone of defending the common-pool resources. It suggests that the left-behind women offer a new governance option for those population hollowing out rural areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)382-399
Number of pages18
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

collective action
collective behavior
natural resources
gender
natural resource
governance
China
village
resource
resources
population migration
endurance
urbanization
exploitation
rural area
decision making
woman
community

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Society and Natural Resources on 20/01/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/08941920.2018.1556757

Keywords

  • Collective action
  • Common-pool resources
  • left-behind women
  • rural governance
  • rural hollowing-out

Cite this

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title = "Governance, Gender and the Appropriation of Natural Resources: A Case Study of ‘Left-Behind’ Women’s Collective Action in China",
abstract = "China’s rapid urbanization has created large scale of population migration, resulting in many villages being dominated by “left-behind” women, and weak governance of those collectively owned resources. The situation has required these women to take up the functions of decision-making and governance as a remedial mechanism as well as a new path. Based on a case study in a typical hollowing-out village in central China, this paper explores an example of left-behind women’s collective action to prevent the over-exploitation of community and resources. It finds out that although traditionally excluded from public activities and marginalized, the “left-behind” women were able to mobilize and enhance collective action. When empowered, they are growing fast with endurance and courage, and as capable as anyone of defending the common-pool resources. It suggests that the left-behind women offer a new governance option for those population hollowing out rural areas.",
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Governance, Gender and the Appropriation of Natural Resources : A Case Study of ‘Left-Behind’ Women’s Collective Action in China. / Du, Yanqiang; Ravenscroft, Neil; Wang, Yan; Liu, Pingyang.

In: Society and Natural Resources, Vol. 32, No. 4, 20.01.2019, p. 382-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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