Future dialogues for illustration

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

With the advent of globalisation, digital technology, the Internet, social media and economic forces, the meaning of what can be illustration is profoundly changing as the practice moves beyond being grounded in print. The instinct to produce authorial work alongside the commercial practice is well established these days for a sustainable career, and collaborative practices are rapidly becoming commonplace amongst Illustrators, if not an essential need, beyond the traditional sole practitioner model. The forms of illustration are evolving past print publishing and the commercial template to also include sculptural, experiential, and moving image work, reflecting the accelerated nature of the creative industry, and a possible paradigm shift in our understanding of what is illustration.
In the preceding five years illustration has grown both in terms of recognition by the public and its popularity as a subject to study. In a world more dominated by image, the discipline is coming to terms with the migration of work from print to web based platforms, offering the opportunities of illustration within a timeline, encouraging the potential of motion, interactivity and participation within the work, challenging the roles of image and communication. This blurring of definition comes at a time when illustration is becoming more craft-like, and authentic through the handmade and the autographic, at the same time more digital as our interactions with everyday life become increasingly immaterial and mobile. Alongside this social networks have enabled illustrators to develop their own brands through the cultivation of audience across social networks.
This chapter will seek to explore the new territorials that illustrators inhabit, suggesting future directions and new approaches for the discipline, including visual storytelling, reportage/journalistic roles, hybrid/multidisciplinary practices, Illustration as environment. Speculating on the future discussions around the discipline and noting some of the significant changes that have influenced illustrators and how possibly what the role of the illustrator is ahead.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationA Companion Guide to Illustration
EditorsAlan Male
Place of PublicationUSA
StatePublished - 2019

Fingerprint

dialogue
social network
cultural economy
instinct
interactive media
social media
social economics
popularity
everyday life
career
globalization
migration
paradigm
Internet
participation
communication
interaction

Keywords

  • Illustration

Cite this

Mills, R. (2019). Future dialogues for illustration. In A. Male (Ed.), A Companion Guide to Illustration USA.
Mills, Roderick. / Future dialogues for illustration. A Companion Guide to Illustration . editor / Alan Male. USA, 2019.
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Mills, R 2019, Future dialogues for illustration. in A Male (ed.), A Companion Guide to Illustration . USA.

Future dialogues for illustration. / Mills, Roderick.

A Companion Guide to Illustration . ed. / Alan Male. USA, 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Mills R. Future dialogues for illustration. In Male A, editor, A Companion Guide to Illustration . USA. 2019.