Fluctuating levels of personal role engagement within the working day: A multilevel study

Luke Fletcher, Catherine Bailey, Mark Gilman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we tested Kahn's (1990) proposition that levels of personal role engagement are influenced by fluctuating perceptions of meaningfulness, safety and availability through the working day. We hypothesized that meaningfulness, safety and availability perceptions would be directly associated with engagement and also that they would mediate the associations between specific job factors, notably job design and fit, social support, and personal and organizational resources, and engagement. A total of 124 participants each completed a quantitative work diary relating to the most and least engaging situations every day within six working days (n = 723 occasions). Multilevel analysis of the findings showed that meaningfulness and availability, but not safety, may be important for boosts and drops in levels of engagement, and that job design, job fit and personal resources play an especially critical role. Organizational resources, co-worker support, and safety were not associated with fluctuations in the level of engagement.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-147
Number of pages20
JournalHuman Resource Management Journal
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sep 2017

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job design
resources
co-worker
multi-level analysis
fluctuation
social support

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Fletcher L, Bailey C, Gilman MW. Fluctuating levels of personal role engagement within the working day: A multilevel study. Hum Resour Manag J. 2018;28:128–147, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1748-8583.12168. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Cite this

Fletcher, Luke ; Bailey, Catherine ; Gilman, Mark. / Fluctuating levels of personal role engagement within the working day: A multilevel study. In: Human Resource Management Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 128-147.
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Fluctuating levels of personal role engagement within the working day: A multilevel study. / Fletcher, Luke; Bailey, Catherine; Gilman, Mark.

In: Human Resource Management Journal, Vol. 28, No. 1, 11.09.2017, p. 128-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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