First report of Laternula elliptica in the Antarctic intertidal zone

Catherine L. Waller, Andrew Overall, Elaine M. Fitzcharles, Huw Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many Antarctic marine invertebrates are considered to be highly stenothermal, subjected to loss of functionality at increased temperatures and so at high risk of mortality in a rapidly warming environment. The bivalveLaternula ellipticais often used as a model taxon to test these theories. Here, we report the first instanceL. ellipticafrom an intertidal site. Genetic analysis of the tissue confirms the species identity. A total of seven animals ranging in length from 6 to 85mm were collected from 3×0.25m2quadrats of intertidal sediments at St Martha Cove on James Ross Island, Eastern Antarctic Peninsula. Ambient temperatures of 7.5°C within the sediment and 10°C (air) were recorded. This raises questions as to the current perception that “many Antarctic marine invertebrates cannot adapt to higher temperatures”.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-230
Number of pages4
JournalPolar Biology
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 May 2016

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

  • Ecophysiology
  • Temperature
  • Stenothermal
  • Climate change
  • Bivalve

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