First report of Laternula elliptica in the Antarctic intertidal zone

Catherine L. Waller, Andrew Overall, Elaine M. Fitzcharles, Huw Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Many Antarctic marine invertebrates are considered to be highly stenothermal, subjected to loss of functionality at increased temperatures and so at high risk of mortality in a rapidly warming environment. The bivalveLaternula ellipticais often used as a model taxon to test these theories. Here, we report the first instanceL. ellipticafrom an intertidal site. Genetic analysis of the tissue confirms the species identity. A total of seven animals ranging in length from 6 to 85mm were collected from 3×0.25m2quadrats of intertidal sediments at St Martha Cove on James Ross Island, Eastern Antarctic Peninsula. Ambient temperatures of 7.5°C within the sediment and 10°C (air) were recorded. This raises questions as to the current perception that “many Antarctic marine invertebrates cannot adapt to higher temperatures”.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-230
Number of pages4
JournalPolar Biology
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 May 2016

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intertidal environment
invertebrate
genetic analysis
sediment
warming
temperature
mortality
animal
air
tissue
loss
test
cove

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

  • Ecophysiology
  • Temperature
  • Stenothermal
  • Climate change
  • Bivalve

Cite this

Waller, Catherine L. ; Overall, Andrew ; Fitzcharles, Elaine M. ; Griffiths, Huw. / First report of Laternula elliptica in the Antarctic intertidal zone. In: Polar Biology. 2016 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 227-230.
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First report of Laternula elliptica in the Antarctic intertidal zone. / Waller, Catherine L.; Overall, Andrew; Fitzcharles, Elaine M.; Griffiths, Huw.

In: Polar Biology, Vol. 40, No. 1, 06.05.2016, p. 227-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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