Figurations of Wounding: Soldiers’ Bodies, Authority, and the Militarisation of Everyday Life

Leila Dawney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article argues that the figures of the wounded and dead soldier are central organising nodes in public objects, events, and institutions and are generative of intense affects and feelings, which are in turn bound to and constitute geopolitical
imaginaries. Through these figurations, bodies of wounded and dead soldiers are brought to visibility, becoming key technologies for the production of authority and attachment, and fostering powerful affective responses in publics that work
to amplify and enliven particular forms of neoliberal militarised nationhood.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalGeopolitics
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

figuration
militarization
soldier
everyday life
key technology
event

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Geopolitics on 11/10/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14650045.2018.1490271

Keywords

  • affect
  • figuration
  • militarisation
  • authority
  • wounding

Cite this

@article{bc4c779527f043b1a3bdd2f9a313e2f8,
title = "Figurations of Wounding: Soldiers’ Bodies, Authority, and the Militarisation of Everyday Life",
abstract = "This article argues that the figures of the wounded and dead soldier are central organising nodes in public objects, events, and institutions and are generative of intense affects and feelings, which are in turn bound to and constitute geopoliticalimaginaries. Through these figurations, bodies of wounded and dead soldiers are brought to visibility, becoming key technologies for the production of authority and attachment, and fostering powerful affective responses in publics that workto amplify and enliven particular forms of neoliberal militarised nationhood.",
keywords = "affect, figuration, militarisation, authority, wounding",
author = "Leila Dawney",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Geopolitics on 11/10/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14650045.2018.1490271",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1080/14650045.2018.1490271",
language = "English",
journal = "Geopolitics",
issn = "1465-0045",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",

}

Figurations of Wounding : Soldiers’ Bodies, Authority, and the Militarisation of Everyday Life. / Dawney, Leila.

In: Geopolitics, 11.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Figurations of Wounding

T2 - Soldiers’ Bodies, Authority, and the Militarisation of Everyday Life

AU - Dawney, Leila

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Geopolitics on 11/10/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14650045.2018.1490271

PY - 2018/10/11

Y1 - 2018/10/11

N2 - This article argues that the figures of the wounded and dead soldier are central organising nodes in public objects, events, and institutions and are generative of intense affects and feelings, which are in turn bound to and constitute geopoliticalimaginaries. Through these figurations, bodies of wounded and dead soldiers are brought to visibility, becoming key technologies for the production of authority and attachment, and fostering powerful affective responses in publics that workto amplify and enliven particular forms of neoliberal militarised nationhood.

AB - This article argues that the figures of the wounded and dead soldier are central organising nodes in public objects, events, and institutions and are generative of intense affects and feelings, which are in turn bound to and constitute geopoliticalimaginaries. Through these figurations, bodies of wounded and dead soldiers are brought to visibility, becoming key technologies for the production of authority and attachment, and fostering powerful affective responses in publics that workto amplify and enliven particular forms of neoliberal militarised nationhood.

KW - affect

KW - figuration

KW - militarisation

KW - authority

KW - wounding

U2 - 10.1080/14650045.2018.1490271

DO - 10.1080/14650045.2018.1490271

M3 - Article

JO - Geopolitics

JF - Geopolitics

SN - 1465-0045

ER -