Facebook and Moodle integration into instructional media design courses: A comparative analysis of students’ learning experiences using the Community of Inquiry (CoI) model

Ioannis Kazanidis, Nikolaos Pellas, Panagiotis Fotaris, Avgoustos Tsinakos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite the educational potential of Facebook and Moodle, there are still unanswered questions about their impact on the student learning experience in a well-defined instructional design framework. This study aimed to compare the learning experiences of students who used Moodle (control group) and Facebook (experimental group), in terms of Community of Inquiry presence indicators, i.e., cognitive, teaching, and social presence. Several learning activities for the development of learning environments were carried out by 97 students who were enrolled in instructional media design courses. Findings from quantitative and qualitative analysis indicated that students using either Moodle or Facebook as their learning platform had similar perceptions of teaching and cognitive presence; however, Facebook users had a better social presence in the Community of Inquiry than their Moodle counterparts. Another point worth noting is that the experimental group’s female participants had better teaching presence, cognitive presence, and overall learning experience than their male peers.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Human-Computer Interaction
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 May 2018

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10447318.2018.1471574

Keywords

  • Community of Inquiry
  • social media
  • instructional media design
  • learning experience

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