Empowering support workers to enable people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities to engage in activity at home

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: People with profound intellectual and multiple disabilitiesmay not always be well-supported to engage meaningfully in activity at home (Mansell 2010), arguably an occupational injustice (Townsend & Wilcock 2004). Research aimed to understand how occupational therapists seek to improve such support and encourage support workers and managers to adopt professionals’recommendations.Method: A single, purposively-selected case of supporting engagement in activity at home was investigated using a critical ethnographic case study method. An occupational therapist worked with five people with profound intellectual disabilities and their support workers over 1 year. Data were collected using ethnographic methods (participant observation, interviews and document analysis).Results: The case’s story highlights challenges encouraging others to follow recommendations as intended (Cross & West 2011). Its two overarching themes are how shifting support and leadership cultures impact on engagement in activity; and how occupational therapy seeks to create and sustain cultural change by working with support workers in a collaborative and empowering way.Conclusions: Staff occupational risks, in particular of burnout where roles are conflicting or ambiguous (Vassos & Nankervis 2012) may need to be addressed whilst promoting occupational justice for residents. The complexity of achieving implementation fidelity may be under-estimated.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDiversity & Belonging: Celebrating Difference
Subtitle of host publicationAbstracts of the Fifth International IASSIDD Europe Congress
PublisherBlackwell Publishing
Pages583
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jun 2018
EventFifth International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD) Europe Congress: Inclusion and Belonging - Athens, Greece
Duration: 17 Jul 201820 Jul 2018
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14683148/2018/31/4

Publication series

NameJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
PublisherWiley
Number4
Volume31
ISSN (Electronic)1468-3148

Conference

ConferenceFifth International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD) Europe Congress
CountryGreece
CityAthens
Period17/07/1820/07/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Intellectual Disability
Occupational Therapy
Social Justice
Observation
Interviews
Research
Occupational Therapists

Keywords

  • occupational therapy
  • intellectual disabilities
  • support workers
  • activities of daily living

Cite this

Haines, D. (2018). Empowering support workers to enable people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities to engage in activity at home. In Diversity & Belonging: Celebrating Difference: Abstracts of the Fifth International IASSIDD Europe Congress (pp. 583). (Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities; Vol. 31, No. 4). Blackwell Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12486
Haines, David. / Empowering support workers to enable people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities to engage in activity at home. Diversity & Belonging: Celebrating Difference: Abstracts of the Fifth International IASSIDD Europe Congress. Blackwell Publishing, 2018. pp. 583 (Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities; 4).
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Haines, D 2018, Empowering support workers to enable people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities to engage in activity at home. in Diversity & Belonging: Celebrating Difference: Abstracts of the Fifth International IASSIDD Europe Congress. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, no. 4, vol. 31, Blackwell Publishing, pp. 583, Fifth International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD) Europe Congress, Athens, Greece, 17/07/18. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12486

Empowering support workers to enable people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities to engage in activity at home. / Haines, David.

Diversity & Belonging: Celebrating Difference: Abstracts of the Fifth International IASSIDD Europe Congress. Blackwell Publishing, 2018. p. 583 (Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities; Vol. 31, No. 4).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

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Haines D. Empowering support workers to enable people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities to engage in activity at home. In Diversity & Belonging: Celebrating Difference: Abstracts of the Fifth International IASSIDD Europe Congress. Blackwell Publishing. 2018. p. 583. (Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities; 4). https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12486