Digital Inclusion and Public Space: The Effect of Mobile Phones on Intergenerational Awareness and Connection

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

This chapter uses the ‘mobilities' lens to explore generational differences in terms of behaviour and attitudes surrounding mobile phone use in everyday public spaces. The mobile phone is a ready accomplice to all forms of contemporary mobility from the everyday and mundane activities within a given neighbourhood through to the global travels of the ‘kinetic elite' (Graham, 2002). As a communication device it provides a source of perpetual contact with significant others that enables the ongoing maintenance of emotional connections whilst on the move, attenuating feelings of physical and virtual proximity. Urry (2007) has suggested that an underlying motive for contemporary mobilities is the deep-seated human need for physical proximity with our significant others, within what others have described as an ‘ontology of connection' (Bissell, 2013). In short, our desire to be close to others drives our need to travel.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntergenerational mobilities: relationality, age and lifecourse
EditorsLesley Murray, Susan Robertson
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages65-77
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781472458766
Publication statusPublished - 13 Oct 2016

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Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Intergenerational mobilities: relationality, age and lifecourse on13/10/2016, available online: https://www.routledge.com/Intergenerational-Mobilities-Relationality-age-and-lifecourse/Murray-Robertson/p/book/9781472458766

Cite this

Harley, D. (2016). Digital Inclusion and Public Space: The Effect of Mobile Phones on Intergenerational Awareness and Connection. In L. Murray, & S. Robertson (Eds.), Intergenerational mobilities: relationality, age and lifecourse (pp. 65-77). Abingdon: Routledge.