Developing the Brighton waste house: from zero waste to on site re-use of waste

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBN

Abstract

This paper considers two linked architectural projects designed and delivered by the author. The first considered the challenges associated with designing and building a energy efficient prefabricated dwelling in just six days, using predominately locally sourced, organic, ‘compostable’ materials whilst creating no waste on site. 5 million viewers a night on UK TV saw this program. However, frustrated by the lack of credible communication of the challenges associated with this project that the medium of TV provided, the author was keen to re-build this project on campus at the University of Brighton where he taught, so that he could involve students in all aspects of the process, thus sharing the learning experience and proving that ‘live’ construction projects could be a useful pedagogic tool. This paper considers why the design emphasis of the second project went from ‘locking carbon’ and zero waste on site, to constructing with waste and proving “that there is no such thing as waste just stuff in the wrong place”. http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/business-and-community/wastehouse
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors
Place of PublicationHamburg
Pages342-351
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2016
EventSustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors - University of the Built Environment Hamburg Germany, 7-11 March 2016
Duration: 14 Mar 2016 → …

Conference

ConferenceSustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors
Period14/03/16 → …

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Communication
Industry

Bibliographical note

This Proceedings are published under the following Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

Keywords

  • Re-use
  • sustainable materials
  • collaborative learning

Cite this

Baker-Brown, D. (2016). Developing the Brighton waste house: from zero waste to on site re-use of waste. In Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors (pp. 342-351). Hamburg. https://doi.org/10.5445/IR/1000051699
Baker-Brown, Duncan. / Developing the Brighton waste house: from zero waste to on site re-use of waste. Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors. Hamburg, 2016. pp. 342-351
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Baker-Brown, D 2016, Developing the Brighton waste house: from zero waste to on site re-use of waste. in Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors. Hamburg, pp. 342-351, Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors, 14/03/16. https://doi.org/10.5445/IR/1000051699

Developing the Brighton waste house: from zero waste to on site re-use of waste. / Baker-Brown, Duncan.

Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors. Hamburg, 2016. p. 342-351.

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Baker-Brown D. Developing the Brighton waste house: from zero waste to on site re-use of waste. In Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 in Hamburg: Strategies, Stakeholders, Success factors. Hamburg. 2016. p. 342-351 https://doi.org/10.5445/IR/1000051699