Controlling God in the UK: the vexed question of political accountability and faith-based groups

A. Barton, N. Johns, M. Hyde, A. Green, Greta Squire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

For twelve years New Labour as the governing party of the UK was apparently obsessed with control, ensuring as far as possible that every aspect of government policy remained centrally directed. However, there was also a growth in the use and importance of third sector agencies in the delivery, and latterly, in the strategic development of, public policy. This created an implementation gap in the delivery of policy and a problem in ensuring that key policy makers from the third sector remain ‘on-message’. In this paper we will demonstrate the difficulties that existed in retaining control while decentralising the delivery and development of public policy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-12
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Politics and Law
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2011

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faith
god
public policy
responsibility
New Labour
government policy
Group

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) and Canadian Center of Science and Education

Keywords

  • Street Pastors
  • Governance
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Accountability

Cite this

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Controlling God in the UK: the vexed question of political accountability and faith-based groups. / Barton, A.; Johns, N.; Hyde, M.; Green, A.; Squire, Greta.

In: Journal of Politics and Law, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.09.2011, p. 3-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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