Continuous exercise induces airway epithelium damage while a matched-intensity and volume intermittent exercise does not

Adrien Combes, Jeanne Dekerle, Xavier Dumont, Rosie Twomey, Alfred Bernard, Frederic Daussin, Valerie Bougault

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: While continuous exercise (CE) induces greater ventilation (V_ E) when compared to intermittent exercise (IE), little is known of the consequences on airway damage. Our aim was to investigate markers of epithelial cell damage – i.e. serum levels of CC16 and of the CC16/SP-D ratio - during and following a bout of CE and IE of matched work. Methods: Sixteen healthy young adults performed a 30-min continuous (CE) and a 60-min intermittent exercise (IE; 1-min work: 1-min rest) on separate occasions in a random order. Intensity was set at 70% of their maximum work rate (WRmax). Heart rate (HR) and V_ E were measured throughout both tests. Blood samples were taken at rest, after the 10th min of the warm-up, at the end of both exercises, half way through IE (matched time but 50% work done for IE) as well as 30- and 60-min post-exercise. Lactate and CC16 and SP-D were determined. Results: Mean V_ E was higher for CE compared to IE (85 ± 17 l.min− 1 vs 50 ± 8 l.min− 1, respectively; P < 0.001). Serum-based markers of epithelial cell damage remained unchanged during IE. Interaction of test × time was observed for SP-D (P = 0.02), CC16 (μg.l− 1) (P = 0.006) and CC16/SP-D ratio (P = 0.03). Maximum delta CC16/SP-D was significantly correlated with mean V_ E sustained (r = 0.83, P < 0.001) during CE but not during IE. Conclusion: The 30-min CE performed at 70% WRmax induced mild airway damage, while a time- or work-matched IE did not. The extent of the damage during CE was associated with the higher ventilation rate.
LanguageEnglish
Article number12
JournalRespiratory Research
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Jan 2019

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Epithelium
Exercise
Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D
Ventilation
Epithelial Cells
Young Adult
Lactic Acid
Biomarkers
Heart Rate

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to
the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver
(http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Keywords

  • Pneumoproteins
  • CC16
  • SP-D
  • Minute ventilation
  • Type of exercise

Cite this

Combes, Adrien ; Dekerle, Jeanne ; Dumont, Xavier ; Twomey, Rosie ; Bernard, Alfred ; Daussin, Frederic ; Bougault, Valerie. / Continuous exercise induces airway epithelium damage while a matched-intensity and volume intermittent exercise does not. 2019 ; Vol. 20.
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abstract = "Background: While continuous exercise (CE) induces greater ventilation (V_ E) when compared to intermittent exercise (IE), little is known of the consequences on airway damage. Our aim was to investigate markers of epithelial cell damage – i.e. serum levels of CC16 and of the CC16/SP-D ratio - during and following a bout of CE and IE of matched work. Methods: Sixteen healthy young adults performed a 30-min continuous (CE) and a 60-min intermittent exercise (IE; 1-min work: 1-min rest) on separate occasions in a random order. Intensity was set at 70\{%} of their maximum work rate (WRmax). Heart rate (HR) and V_ E were measured throughout both tests. Blood samples were taken at rest, after the 10th min of the warm-up, at the end of both exercises, half way through IE (matched time but 50\{%} work done for IE) as well as 30- and 60-min post-exercise. Lactate and CC16 and SP-D were determined. Results: Mean V_ E was higher for CE compared to IE (85 ± 17 l.min− 1 vs 50 ± 8 l.min− 1, respectively; P < 0.001). Serum-based markers of epithelial cell damage remained unchanged during IE. Interaction of test × time was observed for SP-D (P = 0.02), CC16 (μg.l− 1) (P = 0.006) and CC16/SP-D ratio (P = 0.03). Maximum delta CC16/SP-D was significantly correlated with mean V_ E sustained (r = 0.83, P < 0.001) during CE but not during IE. Conclusion: The 30-min CE performed at 70\{%} WRmax induced mild airway damage, while a time- or work-matched IE did not. The extent of the damage during CE was associated with the higher ventilation rate.",
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Continuous exercise induces airway epithelium damage while a matched-intensity and volume intermittent exercise does not. / Combes, Adrien; Dekerle, Jeanne; Dumont, Xavier; Twomey, Rosie; Bernard, Alfred; Daussin, Frederic; Bougault, Valerie.

Vol. 20, 12, 17.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Continuous exercise induces airway epithelium damage while a matched-intensity and volume intermittent exercise does not

AU - Combes,Adrien

AU - Dekerle,Jeanne

AU - Dumont,Xavier

AU - Twomey,Rosie

AU - Bernard,Alfred

AU - Daussin,Frederic

AU - Bougault,Valerie

N1 - © The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

PY - 2019/1/17

Y1 - 2019/1/17

N2 - Background: While continuous exercise (CE) induces greater ventilation (V_ E) when compared to intermittent exercise (IE), little is known of the consequences on airway damage. Our aim was to investigate markers of epithelial cell damage – i.e. serum levels of CC16 and of the CC16/SP-D ratio - during and following a bout of CE and IE of matched work. Methods: Sixteen healthy young adults performed a 30-min continuous (CE) and a 60-min intermittent exercise (IE; 1-min work: 1-min rest) on separate occasions in a random order. Intensity was set at 70% of their maximum work rate (WRmax). Heart rate (HR) and V_ E were measured throughout both tests. Blood samples were taken at rest, after the 10th min of the warm-up, at the end of both exercises, half way through IE (matched time but 50% work done for IE) as well as 30- and 60-min post-exercise. Lactate and CC16 and SP-D were determined. Results: Mean V_ E was higher for CE compared to IE (85 ± 17 l.min− 1 vs 50 ± 8 l.min− 1, respectively; P < 0.001). Serum-based markers of epithelial cell damage remained unchanged during IE. Interaction of test × time was observed for SP-D (P = 0.02), CC16 (μg.l− 1) (P = 0.006) and CC16/SP-D ratio (P = 0.03). Maximum delta CC16/SP-D was significantly correlated with mean V_ E sustained (r = 0.83, P < 0.001) during CE but not during IE. Conclusion: The 30-min CE performed at 70% WRmax induced mild airway damage, while a time- or work-matched IE did not. The extent of the damage during CE was associated with the higher ventilation rate.

AB - Background: While continuous exercise (CE) induces greater ventilation (V_ E) when compared to intermittent exercise (IE), little is known of the consequences on airway damage. Our aim was to investigate markers of epithelial cell damage – i.e. serum levels of CC16 and of the CC16/SP-D ratio - during and following a bout of CE and IE of matched work. Methods: Sixteen healthy young adults performed a 30-min continuous (CE) and a 60-min intermittent exercise (IE; 1-min work: 1-min rest) on separate occasions in a random order. Intensity was set at 70% of their maximum work rate (WRmax). Heart rate (HR) and V_ E were measured throughout both tests. Blood samples were taken at rest, after the 10th min of the warm-up, at the end of both exercises, half way through IE (matched time but 50% work done for IE) as well as 30- and 60-min post-exercise. Lactate and CC16 and SP-D were determined. Results: Mean V_ E was higher for CE compared to IE (85 ± 17 l.min− 1 vs 50 ± 8 l.min− 1, respectively; P < 0.001). Serum-based markers of epithelial cell damage remained unchanged during IE. Interaction of test × time was observed for SP-D (P = 0.02), CC16 (μg.l− 1) (P = 0.006) and CC16/SP-D ratio (P = 0.03). Maximum delta CC16/SP-D was significantly correlated with mean V_ E sustained (r = 0.83, P < 0.001) during CE but not during IE. Conclusion: The 30-min CE performed at 70% WRmax induced mild airway damage, while a time- or work-matched IE did not. The extent of the damage during CE was associated with the higher ventilation rate.

KW - Pneumoproteins

KW - CC16

KW - SP-D

KW - Minute ventilation

KW - Type of exercise

U2 - 10.1186/s12931-019-0978-1

DO - 10.1186/s12931-019-0978-1

M3 - Article

VL - 20

M1 - 12

ER -