Coastal elevation changes in eastern Sicily: implications for volcano instability at Mount Etna

Callum Firth, I. Stewart, W.J. McGuire, S. Kershaw, C. Vita-Finzi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBN

Abstract

The eastern flank of Mount Etna, Sicily has been recognised as being unstable, and three contrasting models have been proposed to account for this phenomenon, these being deep-seated spreading, shallow sliding and tectonic block movements. These models are examined by making reference to the rates and patterns of crustal movement along the eastern coastline of Sicily as determined from palaeoshoreline data. The south-eastern coastline of Sicily (portopalo to Catania) provides no evidence of Holocene emergence. In contrast the volcanic coastline (Catania to Capo Schiso) and the northeastern shoreline (Taormina to Milazzo) display widespread evidence of coastal emergence. radiocarbon dated remains indicate that both the volcano and northeastern Sicily have been uplifted at a rate exceeding 1.5mm/yr during Holocene times, although more recent rates of uplift may have been greater. The pattern of uplift suggests that the northeastern coastline of Sicily, including the volcanic ediface, is apparently uplifting as a coherent unit, with superficial flank movements being superimposed on a regionally uplifting sub-volcanic basement.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSpecial publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability
Place of PublicationBath, UK
PublisherGeological Society Publishing House
Pages153-167
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)1897799608
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 1996
EventSpecial publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability - London, UK
Duration: 31 Dec 1996 → …

Publication series

NameGeological Society Special Publication

Conference

ConferenceSpecial publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability
Period31/12/96 → …

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volcano
coast
uplift
Holocene
crustal movement
sliding
shoreline
tectonics
rate

Cite this

Firth, C., Stewart, I., McGuire, W. J., Kershaw, S., & Vita-Finzi, C. (1996). Coastal elevation changes in eastern Sicily: implications for volcano instability at Mount Etna. In Special publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability (pp. 153-167). (Geological Society Special Publication). Bath, UK: Geological Society Publishing House.
Firth, Callum ; Stewart, I. ; McGuire, W.J. ; Kershaw, S. ; Vita-Finzi, C. / Coastal elevation changes in eastern Sicily: implications for volcano instability at Mount Etna. Special publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability. Bath, UK : Geological Society Publishing House, 1996. pp. 153-167 (Geological Society Special Publication).
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Firth, C, Stewart, I, McGuire, WJ, Kershaw, S & Vita-Finzi, C 1996, Coastal elevation changes in eastern Sicily: implications for volcano instability at Mount Etna. in Special publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability. Geological Society Special Publication, Geological Society Publishing House, Bath, UK, pp. 153-167, Special publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability, 31/12/96.

Coastal elevation changes in eastern Sicily: implications for volcano instability at Mount Etna. / Firth, Callum; Stewart, I.; McGuire, W.J.; Kershaw, S.; Vita-Finzi, C.

Special publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability. Bath, UK : Geological Society Publishing House, 1996. p. 153-167 (Geological Society Special Publication).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBN

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AB - The eastern flank of Mount Etna, Sicily has been recognised as being unstable, and three contrasting models have been proposed to account for this phenomenon, these being deep-seated spreading, shallow sliding and tectonic block movements. These models are examined by making reference to the rates and patterns of crustal movement along the eastern coastline of Sicily as determined from palaeoshoreline data. The south-eastern coastline of Sicily (portopalo to Catania) provides no evidence of Holocene emergence. In contrast the volcanic coastline (Catania to Capo Schiso) and the northeastern shoreline (Taormina to Milazzo) display widespread evidence of coastal emergence. radiocarbon dated remains indicate that both the volcano and northeastern Sicily have been uplifted at a rate exceeding 1.5mm/yr during Holocene times, although more recent rates of uplift may have been greater. The pattern of uplift suggests that the northeastern coastline of Sicily, including the volcanic ediface, is apparently uplifting as a coherent unit, with superficial flank movements being superimposed on a regionally uplifting sub-volcanic basement.

M3 - Conference contribution with ISSN or ISBN

SN - 1897799608

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Firth C, Stewart I, McGuire WJ, Kershaw S, Vita-Finzi C. Coastal elevation changes in eastern Sicily: implications for volcano instability at Mount Etna. In Special publication - Geological Society of London; Volcano instability. Bath, UK: Geological Society Publishing House. 1996. p. 153-167. (Geological Society Special Publication).