Can students be 'nudged' to develop their employability? Using behavioural change methods to encourage uptake of industrial placements.

Julie Fowlie, Clare Forder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

Abstract

An important aspect of preparing students for the workplace is the need for students to take ownership of their employability and to engage in opportunities which can help them improve and articulate it in advance of embarking on their careers after graduating. Industrial placements, alongside other employability-enhancing opportunities, play an important role in this. Nonetheless, in recent years there has been a decline in the number of students opting to undertake a year in industry. Positioned within the debate surrounding undergraduate employability, this paper will explore nudge theory, and its criticisms, in the context of an intervention implemented by staff at Brighton Business School (BBS), University of Brighton designed to promote students’ ownership of their employability to increase the uptake of industrial placements. It also identifies some soft outcomes, notably the breaking down of some typical behavioural barriers to placements and encouraging students to think reflectively. It will conclude by offering recommendations for replicable practice in other universities; specifically a model for developing nudges not only in relation to employability but within higher education more broadly.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASET Annual Conference 2018
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 2018Placement and Employability Professionals’ Conference
Place of PublicationSheffield
PublisherASET
Pages217-233
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780995541184
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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employability
student
business school
criticism
workplace
career
staff
industry
university
education

Bibliographical note

©ASET and Individual Contributors

Cite this

Fowlie, J., & Forder, C. (2018). Can students be 'nudged' to develop their employability? Using behavioural change methods to encourage uptake of industrial placements. In ASET Annual Conference 2018: Proceedings of the 2018Placement and Employability Professionals’ Conference (pp. 217-233). Sheffield: ASET.
Fowlie, Julie ; Forder, Clare. / Can students be 'nudged' to develop their employability? Using behavioural change methods to encourage uptake of industrial placements. ASET Annual Conference 2018: Proceedings of the 2018Placement and Employability Professionals’ Conference. Sheffield : ASET, 2018. pp. 217-233
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Fowlie, J & Forder, C 2018, Can students be 'nudged' to develop their employability? Using behavioural change methods to encourage uptake of industrial placements. in ASET Annual Conference 2018: Proceedings of the 2018Placement and Employability Professionals’ Conference. ASET, Sheffield, pp. 217-233.

Can students be 'nudged' to develop their employability? Using behavioural change methods to encourage uptake of industrial placements. / Fowlie, Julie; Forder, Clare.

ASET Annual Conference 2018: Proceedings of the 2018Placement and Employability Professionals’ Conference. Sheffield : ASET, 2018. p. 217-233.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

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Fowlie J, Forder C. Can students be 'nudged' to develop their employability? Using behavioural change methods to encourage uptake of industrial placements. In ASET Annual Conference 2018: Proceedings of the 2018Placement and Employability Professionals’ Conference. Sheffield: ASET. 2018. p. 217-233