Burrswood's Standardised Data Collection Tool (BSDCT) for people with Multiple Sclerosis

O. Krouwel, Krishna Garikipati, Raija Kuisma, Sarah-Jayne Ryan

Research output: Other contribution

Abstract

Aims: To develop a standardised data collection tool that could be used across the UK as an evaluation and audit tool of physiotherapy services for people with Multiple Sclerosis. Objectives: To provide comprehensive information on the development of a Standardised Data Collection tool for physiotherapy practice for people with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS). Design: The Burrswood Standardised Data Collection Tool (BSDCT) was developed and used to collect anonymised data relating to physiotherapy services for people with Multiple Sclerosis. The data is collated, analysed and presented in this report. The developed Burrswood Standardised Data Collection Tool was based on previous work (HyDAT, 2010 and Moore, et al., 2012) and followed a systematic process involving consultation with all stakeholders including people with Multiple Sclerosis, families, Carers, Specialist Nurses, Physiotherapists, Consultant Neurologists and representatives of the MS society. Data collection period: February 2010 – June 2012. Data: One hundred completed data sets were gathered that included eight physiotherapy interventions. The eight sessions include an initial assessment, six dedicated treatment sessions and a follow up assessment. Data included anonymised patient demographics, diagnosis, referral information, treatment details, outcome measures and service related information. Data analysis: The data collected using the Burrswood Standardised Data Collection Tool was entered into Excel 2010 (version 14). The descriptive data is presented in this report. Main findings: Progressive (primary and secondary) Multiple Sclerosis was the diagnosis in 67% of patients with 30% diagnosed with relapse remitting and 3% with benign Multiple Sclerosis. Burrswood Standardised Data Collection Tool 2014. Outcome measures showed an overall percentage improvement in fatigue, health related quality of life and balance and gait using MFIS, MSIS-29 and POMA respectively. The Balance and gait scale (POMA) showed aquatic physiotherapy had a 19% more positive response than land based physiotherapy. Eighty four percent of patients, who completed the course of eight sessions, expressed that they were motivated to continue with independent exercises and 73% intended to continue with exercise at Burrswood Hospital. A wide range of treatments were used with the four most common being: balance re-education/exercise, functional exercises, weight bearing exercise and active strengthening.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherClinical Research Centre for Health Professions, University of Brighton
Place of PublicationEastbourne, UK
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2014

Bibliographical note

© 2014 Clinical Research Centre for Health Professions, University of Brighton

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    Krouwel, O., Garikipati, K., Kuisma, R., & Ryan, S-J. (2014, Feb 14). Burrswood's Standardised Data Collection Tool (BSDCT) for people with Multiple Sclerosis. Clinical Research Centre for Health Professions, University of Brighton.