Biofilm formation and changes in bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity during growth in a CAPD model system

Geoff Hanlon, Stephen Denyer, N.A. Hodges, J.A. Brant, Alison Lansley, W.A. Al-Rustamani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Peritonitis is a frequent complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), with patients suffering recurrent attacks. The microorganisms most frequently implicated in the infection are the skin microflora, in particular, the coagulase-negative staphylococci such as Staphylococcus epidermidis. These microorganisms gain access to the peritoneal cavity via the in-dwelling silicone rubber catheter in the abdominal wall and often persist as biofilms on the surface of the catheter. The surface characteristics of S. epidermidis were monitored during growth in a CAPD in-vitro model together with their ability to adhere to silicone rubber substrata. Fresh dialysis fluid exerted an injurious effect on the cells leading to a decrease in cell numbers but during the simulated dialysis period the cells adapted to the applied stresses. Over a 96-h period in the model both a clinical isolate and a skin isolate of S. epidermidis adopted a more hydrophobic phenotype. The data presented here show that the bacteria grown in this in-vivo reflective CAPD model continually adapt to their environment and become more tolerant to the stresses imposed. The adapted cells were seen to colonise silicone rubber substrata.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)847-854
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Volume56
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2004

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