Assessing the locomotor demands of international men’s and women’s rugby sevens match-play according to passage of play

Samuel P. Hills, Erwan Izri, Daniel Howells, Ben Lonergan, Liam P. Kilduff, Mark Waldron, Ersan Arslan (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the effect of discrete passages of play on locomotor demands of international men’s and women’s rugby sevens matches and their relationship with winning or losing. Thirteen men’s and thirteen women’s international rugby sevens players wore 10 Hz Global Positioning Systems during twelve Tokyo Olympic games matches (966 observations; 507 for men, 459 for women). Discrete ball-in-play periods were categorised as: ‘Single-phase defence’, ‘single-phase attack’, ‘multi-phase defence’, ‘multi-phase attack’, ‘multi-phase defence to attack’, or ‘multi-phase attack to defence’. Relative total distance, alongside high-speed (>5.0 m∙s-1), acceleration (>3 m∙s-2), and deceleration (>3 m∙s-2) distances were recorded for each passage. Separately for men and women, linear mixed models examined the effect of passage type and match outcome (win or loss) on locomotor demands, whilst controlling for opposition ranking. In men, relative total distance ranged from 137 m∙min-1 to 174 m∙min-1 for ‘multi-phase defence to attack’ and ‘multi-phase attack’, respectively. In women, ‘multi-phase attack’ elicited the lowest relative total distance (118 m∙min-1), whereas the greatest values (186 m∙min-1) were recorded for ‘single-phase defence’. For men, there were significant interactions between match outcome and passage type for relative total (p
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0304186
Number of pages12
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jun 2024

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