A practical case study exploring how flipped learning affects the development of problem-solving skills in two different disciplines

Malgorzata Iwaniec, Tatiana Simmonds, Zoe Swan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Flipped learning involves ‘direct instruction moving from the group learning space to the individual learning space and the resulting group space being transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment, where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter’ Flipped Learning Network (2014). This study explores how the flipped-learning pedagogy was introduced to two separate student groups within different disciplines - law and computing - and compares the findings that have begun to emerge in relation to the development of a range of skills, in particular the development of problem-solving skills. Analytical and problem-solving skills are key skills, not only for both law students and computing students, but also for any graduate. The findings suggest that the flipped-classroom approach to teaching and learning can increase student participation and engagement; that it supports the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills; that it promotes deeper levels of learning; that it encourages the development of independent study skills and provides opportunities for students to develop and practise the core skills required of the students by their discipline. This paper also explores what both students and academics perceived as the challenges and what they regarded as the benefits of working with the flipped teaching and learning strategy during the academic year 2014/15.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCompass: Journal of Learning and Teaching
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Bibliographical note

Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

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