A planar microelectrode array for simultaneous detection of electrically evoked dopamine release from distinct locations of a single isolated neuron

Bhavik Patel, Collin C. Luk, Pei Ling Leow, Arthur J. Lee, Wali Zaidi, N.I. Syed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neurotransmission is a key process of communication between neurons. Although much is known about this process and the influence it has on the function of the body, little is understood about the dynamics of signalling from structural regions of a single neuron. In this study we have fabricated and characterised a microelectrode array (MEA) which was utilised for simultaneous multi-site recordings of dopamine release from an isolated single neuron. The MEA consisted of gold electrodes that were created in plane with the insulation layer using a chemical mechanical planarization process. The detection limit for dopamine measurements was 11 ± 3 nM and all the gold electrodes performed in a consistent fashion during amperometric recordings of 100 nM dopamine. Fouling of the gold electrode was investigated, where no significant change in the current was observed over 4 hours when monitoring 100 nM dopamine. The MEA was accessed using freshly isolated dopaminergic somas from the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, where electrically evoked dopamine release was clearly observed. Measurements were conducted at four structural locations of a single isolated neuron, where electrically evoked dopamine release was observed from the cell body, axonal regions and the terminal. Over time, the release of dopamine varied over the structural regions of the neuron. Such information can provide an insight into the signalling mechanism of neurons and how they potentially form synaptic connections.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2833-2839
Number of pages7
JournalThe Analyst
Volume138
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2013

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