A comparative analysis of how regulatory codes inform broadcast and print sports journalists' work routines in the UK using Sky Sports News and the Sun as case studies

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Abstract

This paper aims to provide a comparative analysis of how regulatory codes influence the work routines of print and broadcast sports journalists in the UK. Sky Sports News 24-hour news channel and the Sun newspaper are used as case studies. The government-regulated broadcast industry interprets autonomy as independence from advertisers and sponsors. Regulation, therefore, creates challenges for broadcast journalists within a hyper-commercialised professional sports environment. Conversely, the press regulator, the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) focuses on autonomy from government rather than business. Print sports journalists, therefore, lack autonomy from commercial pressures as media managers can exercise a degree of editorial control. This analysis examines sports journalism's fragmented professional culture while arguing that broadcast sports journalists' ethical conduct is more complex than has previously been acknowledged.
LanguageEnglish
Pages43-51
Number of pages9
JournalEthical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics
Volume15
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - 8 Mar 2018

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sports news
broadcast
journalist
Sports
autonomy
news channel
professional sports
journalism
newspaper
manager
regulation
industry
lack

Bibliographical note

© 2018-1/2. Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics. All rights reserved. Vol 15, No 1/2 2018. Made available here by permission.

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper aims to provide a comparative analysis of how regulatory codes influence the work routines of print and broadcast sports journalists in the UK. Sky Sports News 24-hour news channel and the Sun newspaper are used as case studies. The government-regulated broadcast industry interprets autonomy as independence from advertisers and sponsors. Regulation, therefore, creates challenges for broadcast journalists within a hyper-commercialised professional sports environment. Conversely, the press regulator, the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) focuses on autonomy from government rather than business. Print sports journalists, therefore, lack autonomy from commercial pressures as media managers can exercise a degree of editorial control. This analysis examines sports journalism's fragmented professional culture while arguing that broadcast sports journalists' ethical conduct is more complex than has previously been acknowledged.",
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